2 Big “poop” Problems You Should Deal With[Infographic]

Why do we poop? How does the delicious food turn into a pile of stinky poop through our body?

Annoyingly, we may have suffered a lot from this call of nature.

A wealth of questions come as follows. What is the cause of constipation and how do I get rid of it? What are the symptoms of chronic constipation? How do I make my poop softer? What does blood in my stool mean? Is blood in stool an emergency?……

Keep looking you will know what the two big poop problems are. There you are~

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constipation causes symptoms of constipation constipation symptoms what causes constipation constipation treatment chronic constipation severe constipation blood in stool mucus blood in stool red blood in stool treatment hematochezia definition

constipation causes symptoms of constipation constipation symptoms what causes constipation constipation treatment chronic constipation severe constipation blood in stool mucus blood in stool red blood in stool treatment hematochezia definition

Yup! The two major concerns about stool are constipation(hard to poop) & hematochezia(blood in stool).

Constipation is a type of symptom; it is not a disease.

But it is an uncomfortable problem with a number of underlying causes.

The constipation causes and symptoms vary from person to person.

I will make it specific for reference.

constipation causes symptoms of constipation constipation symptoms what causes constipation constipation treatment chronic constipation severe constipation blood in stool mucus blood in stool red blood in stool treatment hematochezia definition

Part 1: Constipation

♦What is the cause of constipation?

Lack of fiber in your diet
Fiber promotes bowel movements and prevents constipation. People whose diets include a good quantity of fiber are significantly less likely to suffer from constipation.
Not drinking enough water
If constipation is already present, drinking more liquids might not relieve it. However, regularly drinking plenty of water reduces the risk of constipation. So make sure to drink enough water. Sparkling water may be even more effective.
Milk
Being intolerant to dairy or lactose may cause constipation in some people. If you suspect dairy is a problem, try removing it for a short period of time to see if that makes a difference.
Physical inactivity
Some believe that physical activity keeps the metabolism high, making the processes in the body happen more rapidly. Physically active people are much less likely to become constipated than inactive people.
Changes in routine
When a person travels, their normal routine changes. This can affect the digestive system, which sometimes results in constipation. Meals are eaten at different times, or a person might go to bed, get up, and go to the toilet at different times. All these changes can raise the risk of constipation.
Not going to the toilet when needed
If individuals ignore the urge to have a bowel movement, the urge can gradually go away until the individual no longer feels the need to go. The longer it is delayed, the drier and harder the stool will become.
Irritable bowel syndrome
People who suffer from irritable bowel syndrome(IBS) get constipation much more frequently, compared with the rest of the population.
Overuse of laxatives
Some people believe a person should go to the toilet at least once a day – this is not true. However, to make sure this happens, some people self-medicate with laxatives.

Laxatives are effective at helping bowel movements. However, using them regularly allows the body to get used to their action and gradually the dose needs to increase to get the same effect.

Laxatives can be habit-forming. When a person becomes dependent on them, there is a significant risk of constipation when they are stopped.

Problems with the colon or rectum
Tumors can compress or restrict the passages and cause constipation. Also, scar tissue, diverticulosis, and abnormal narrowing of the colon or rectum, known as a colorectal stricture.

People with Hirschsprung disease are susceptible to constipation (a birth defect in which some nerve cells are absent in the large intestine).

Pregnancy
Pregnancy brings about hormonal changes that can make a woman more susceptible to constipation. Also, the uterus may compress the intestine, slowing down the passage of food.
Aging
As a person gets older, the metabolism slows down, resulting in less intestinal activity. The muscles in the digestive tract do not work as well as they used to.

♦How can I avoid constipation? (Natural remedies/Treatment)

There are a few ways to ease the symptoms of constipation without using medication. But speak with your doctor about the best course of action if symptoms are not responding to natural or home remedies.

Increasing fiber intake
People with constipation should eat between 18 and 30 grams (g) of fiber every day.Fresh fruits and vegetables and fortified cereals have high fiber content. Try eating more fiber. You can also supplement your diet with soluble non-fermentable fiber such as psyllium.

Some good sources of soluble fiber include:

  • Oatmeal and oat bran
  • Apples, citrus fruits, and strawberries
  • Beans, peas, and lentils
  • Barley
  • Rice bran

And some sources of insoluble fiber are:

  • Cereal brans
  • Whole grains, like barley
  • Whole-wheat breads, wheat cereals, and wheat bran
  • Vegetables like carrots, cabbage, beets, and cauliflower

Some foods, like nuts, contain both soluble and insoluble fiber.

Drinking more water
Regular exercise
Avoiding holding in stools
Try avoiding dairy
Elevate your feet
Place your feet short platform, such as a step, and make sure the knees are above hip-level while passing stools. This can reduce constipation.

♦Complications

Constipation on its own can be uncomfortable but not life-threatening. However, severe constipation can develop into more serious conditions, including:

  • rectal bleeding after continually straining to pass stools
  • anal fissure, or a small tear around the anus
  • hemorrhoids, or swollen, inflamed blood vessels of veins in the rectum
  • faecal impaction, in which dried stools collect in the anus and rectum, leading to an obstruction in the path stool would take to leave the body

constipation causes symptoms of constipation constipation symptoms what causes constipation constipation treatment chronic constipation severe constipation blood in stool mucus blood in stool red blood in stool treatment hematochezia definition

Part 2: Hematochezia

♦What does blood in my stool mean?

Some of the more common, less-serious causes of bloody stool include: 

Anal Fissures
An anal fissure is a small tear in the lining of the anus, which can cause bleeding and the sensation of ripping, tearing or burning after a bowel movement.
Hemorrhoids
Hemorrhoids are swollen blood vessels found in the rectum or anus that can be itchy, painful and sometimes bleed. Bright red blood typically coats the stool or blood may drip into the toilet or on the paper.
Peptic Ulcers
A peptic ulcer is an open sore in the lining of the stomach, upper end of the small intestine or duodenum caused by a bacterial infection.
Food poisoning
In addition to other issues, several foodborne organisms can cause bloody stool. A stool sample can help identify which bacteria you have been exposed to and how to treat the infection.

Other more serious causes of blood in stool include:

Crohn’s disease
Crohn’s disease causes inflammation of the digestive tract lining and can lead to severe diarrhea and abdominal pain.
Colon Polyps
Colon polyps are benign growths, or clumps of cells, that form along the lining of the colon. Although usually harmless, colon polyps can grow, bleed and become cancerous.
Cancer
Blood in stool can be a symptom of cancer along the digestive tract. Colon cancer and anal cancer are two types that can cause bleeding; sometimes not noticeable to the naked eye to more severe bleeding.

If you see blood in your stool, Do Not Panic. Whatever you do, don’t ignore it, contact your doctor. 

Share with those who have “poo-poo” problem around you, maybe you should @them on social media. Have Fun!

References
  • National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse.
  • National Institutes of Health.
  • American Academy of Family Physicians.
  • Constipation. National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse. http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddiseases/pubs/constipation/index.aspx. 2016.
  • The impact of laxative use upon symptoms in patients with proven slow transit constipation BMC Gastroenterology. 2011;11(1):121 DOI 10.1186/1471-230X-11-121
  • McKhann CF, Wilson ID. A rational approach to gastrointestinal bleeding emergencies. Hosp Pract. 1971;6:125–37.

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